04 9 / 2014

So, this year has been pretty full. I never really posted much about it, but for most that follow me on Facebook kinda got a gist of what was going on. 
In February I made the hard and difficult decision to leave my husband of 4 years (we had been together for 8). I wasn’t happy. In fact most of the time I was forcing myself to appear happy most of the time. Im unsure of how to fully share this story, I’ve never thought of how I would tell it. So the weird way, for me anyway.

At the end of last year I met a new coworker at my job,  and around the end of January we were texting everyday. I don’t really know when it exactly happened but after a time when we were close to one another, it felt as if little strings were starting to connect us. This was odd for me, this person was a female and as far as I knew I wasnt into females. I always felt and thought of myself as strictly straight, but I continued to see where this new road would take me. In February things picked up when we both realized how happy we made each other, and how much we were starting to care for another. Now, we both were married so yes what we were doing was so wrong. :/ 
We both told our partners we werent happy with them and wanted a divorce.  
So.. (please reference the photo above) 
This is Felisha.  ^.^ so far things have been wonderful, well until the past month or so. Mostly because of all my insecurities.  We started off being so intune with each others emotions and knowing when the other was troubled,  but recently I haven’t been able to fight this gut feeling that something is wrong between us. She tells me we are fine and I try to let it go, but some days the feeling is just so wrong. I feel as if I am going crazy. 
I mostly just wanted a place to open up and rant. Now that I have poured some (definitely not all) I  think some chocolate milk therapy is in order.

So, this year has been pretty full. I never really posted much about it, but for most that follow me on Facebook kinda got a gist of what was going on.
In February I made the hard and difficult decision to leave my husband of 4 years (we had been together for 8). I wasn’t happy. In fact most of the time I was forcing myself to appear happy most of the time. Im unsure of how to fully share this story, I’ve never thought of how I would tell it. So the weird way, for me anyway.

At the end of last year I met a new coworker at my job, and around the end of January we were texting everyday. I don’t really know when it exactly happened but after a time when we were close to one another, it felt as if little strings were starting to connect us. This was odd for me, this person was a female and as far as I knew I wasnt into females. I always felt and thought of myself as strictly straight, but I continued to see where this new road would take me. In February things picked up when we both realized how happy we made each other, and how much we were starting to care for another. Now, we both were married so yes what we were doing was so wrong. :/
We both told our partners we werent happy with them and wanted a divorce.
So.. (please reference the photo above)
This is Felisha. ^.^ so far things have been wonderful, well until the past month or so. Mostly because of all my insecurities. We started off being so intune with each others emotions and knowing when the other was troubled, but recently I haven’t been able to fight this gut feeling that something is wrong between us. She tells me we are fine and I try to let it go, but some days the feeling is just so wrong. I feel as if I am going crazy.
I mostly just wanted a place to open up and rant. Now that I have poured some (definitely not all) I think some chocolate milk therapy is in order.

16 8 / 2014

perspicious:


WHAT YOU SHOULD DO:    Stay with us and keep calm.The last thing we need when we’re panicking, is to have someone else panicking with us.
Offer medicine if we usually take it during an attack.You might have to ask whether or not we take medicine- heck, some might not; but please, ask. It really helps.
Move us to a quiet place.We need time to think, to breathe. Being surrounded by people isn’t going to help.
Don’t make assumptions about what we need. Ask.We’ll tell you what we need. Sometimes; you may have to ask- but never assume.
Speak to us in short, simple sentences.
Be predictable. Avoid surprises.
Help slow our breathing by breathing us or by counting slowly to 10.As odd as it sounds, it works.


                                                                                                                 


WHAT YOU SHOULDN’T DO:1. Say, “You have nothing to be panicked about.”We know. We know. We know. And because we know we have nothing to be panicked about, we panic even more. When I realize that my anxiety is unfounded, I panic even more because then I feel like I’m not in touch with reality. It’s unsettling. Scary.Most of the time, a panic attack is irrational. Sometimes they stem from circumstances — a certain couch triggers a bad memory or being on an airplane makes you claustrophobic or a break up causes you to flip your lid — but mostly, the reasons I’m panicking are complex, hard to articulate or simply, unknown. I could tell myself all day that I have no reason to be having a panic attack and I would still be panicking. Sometimes, because I’m a perfectionist, I become even more overwhelmed when I think my behaviour is “unacceptable” (as I often believe it is when I’m panicking). I know it’s all in my mind, but my mind can be a pretty dark and scary place when it gets going.Alternate suggestion: Say, “I understand you’re upset. It is okay. You have a right to be upset and I am here to help.”2. Say, “Calm down.”This reminds me of a MadTV sketch where Bob Newhart plays a therapist who tells his patients to simply “Stop it!” whenever they express anxiety or fear. As a sketch, it’s funny. In real life, it’s one of the worst things you can do to someone having a panic attack. When someone tells me to “stop panicking” or to “calm down,” I just think, “Oh, okay. I haven’t tried that one. Hold on, let me get out a pen and paper and jot that down, you jerk.”Instead of taking action so that they do relax, simply telling a panicking person to “calm down” or “stop it” does nothing. No-thing.Alternate suggestion: The best thing to do is to listen and support. In order to calm them down without the generalities, counting helps.3. Say, “I’m just going to leave you alone for a minute.”Being left alone while panicking makes my heart race even harder. The last thing I want is to be left by myself with my troubled brain. Many of my panic attacks spark from over-thinking and it’s helpful to have another person with me, not only for medical reasons (in case I pass out or need water) but also it’s helpful to have another person around to force me to think about something other than the noise in my head.Alternate suggestion: It sometimes helps me if the person I’m with distracts me by telling me a story or sings to me. I need to get out of my own head and think about something other than my own panic.4. Say, “You’re overreacting.”Here’s the thing: I’m not. Panic attacks might be in my head, but I’m in actual physical pain. If you’d cut open your leg, no one would be telling you you’re overreacting. It’s a common trope in mental health to diminish the feelings or experience of someone suffering from anxiety or panic because there’s no visible physical ailment and because there’s no discernible reason for the person to be having such a strong fear reaction.The worst thing you can tell someone who is panicking is that they are overreacting.Alternate suggestion: Treat a panic attack like any other medical emergency. Listen to what the person is telling you. Get them water if they need it. It helps me if someone rubs my back a little. If you’re in over your head, don’t hesitate to call 911 (or whatever the emergency services number is where you are). But please, take the person seriously. Mental health deserves the same respect as physical health.



CREDIT [X]  [X]

perspicious:

WHAT YOU SHOULD DO:
    
  1. Stay with us and keep calm.
    The last thing we need when we’re panicking, is to have someone else panicking with us.

  2. Offer medicine if we usually take it during an attack.
    You might have to ask whether or not we take medicine- heck, some might not; but please, ask. It really helps.

  3. Move us to a quiet place.
    We need time to think, to breathe. Being surrounded by people isn’t going to help.

  4. Don’t make assumptions about what we need. Ask.
    We’ll tell you what we need. Sometimes; you may have to ask- but never assume.

  5. Speak to us in short, simple sentences.

  6. Be predictable. Avoid surprises.

  7. Help slow our breathing by breathing us or by counting slowly to 10.
    As odd as it sounds, it works.
                                                                                                                 
WHAT YOU SHOULDN’T DO:

1. Say, “You have nothing to be panicked about.”
We know. We know. We know. And because we know we have nothing to be panicked about, we panic even more. When I realize that my anxiety is unfounded, I panic even more because then I feel like I’m not in touch with reality. It’s unsettling. Scary.

Most of the time, a panic attack is irrational. Sometimes they stem from circumstances — a certain couch triggers a bad memory or being on an airplane makes you claustrophobic or a break up causes you to flip your lid — but mostly, the reasons I’m panicking are complex, hard to articulate or simply, unknown. I could tell myself all day that I have no reason to be having a panic attack and I would still be panicking. Sometimes, because I’m a perfectionist, I become even more overwhelmed when I think my behaviour is “unacceptable” (as I often believe it is when I’m panicking). I know it’s all in my mind, but my mind can be a pretty dark and scary place when it gets going.

Alternate suggestion: Say, “I understand you’re upset. It is okay. You have a right to be upset and I am here to help.”


2. Say, “Calm down.”
This reminds me of a MadTV sketch where Bob Newhart plays a therapist who tells his patients to simply “Stop it!” whenever they express anxiety or fear. As a sketch, it’s funny. In real life, it’s one of the worst things you can do to someone having a panic attack. When someone tells me to “stop panicking” or to “calm down,” I just think, “Oh, okay. I haven’t tried that one. Hold on, let me get out a pen and paper and jot that down, you jerk.

Instead of taking action so that they do relax, simply telling a panicking person to “calm down” or “stop it” does nothing. No-thing.

Alternate suggestion: The best thing to do is to listen and support. In order to calm them down without the generalities, counting helps.


3. Say, “I’m just going to leave you alone for a minute.”
Being left alone while panicking makes my heart race even harder. The last thing I want is to be left by myself with my troubled brain. Many of my panic attacks spark from over-thinking and it’s helpful to have another person with me, not only for medical reasons (in case I pass out or need water) but also it’s helpful to have another person around to force me to think about something other than the noise in my head.

Alternate suggestion: It sometimes helps me if the person I’m with distracts me by telling me a story or sings to me. I need to get out of my own head and think about something other than my own panic.


4. Say, “You’re overreacting.”
Here’s the thing: I’m not. Panic attacks might be in my head, but I’m in actual physical pain. If you’d cut open your leg, no one would be telling you you’re overreacting. It’s a common trope in mental health to diminish the feelings or experience of someone suffering from anxiety or panic because there’s no visible physical ailment and because there’s no discernible reason for the person to be having such a strong fear reaction.

The worst thing you can tell someone who is panicking is that they are overreacting.

Alternate suggestion: Treat a panic attack like any other medical emergency. Listen to what the person is telling you. Get them water if they need it. It helps me if someone rubs my back a little. If you’re in over your head, don’t hesitate to call 911 (or whatever the emergency services number is where you are). But please, take the person seriously. Mental health deserves the same respect as physical health.


CREDIT [X]  [X]

(via tyleroakley)

26 7 / 2014

26 7 / 2014

dragonsroar:

Since i know i wouldn’t even have the patience to do this unless i made something fancy like this. I’m in an art slump and it’s time to get over it, and if you want, you can do this thing with me.

The point of this isn’t to make a fantastic piece of art every day, it’s to experiment in areas you are uncomfortable with and try out new things.

======

Art reference masterposts: X X (trust me, that will be more than enough)

Great art reference tumblrs: X X X X X

Inspiration: Animeclay | fyeahmonochromeart  | theartofanimation | conceptartworld | creativeuncut | fuckyeahillustrativeart

Other fun/helpful things for ideas/my favorites: color-palettes | strike a pose | pixel art tutorials | colorshipping | monster boy/girl generator | art reference wiki | links of inspiration and advice

====

Phew! Anyway I hope this little project will help. You don’t have to do it for 30 days or anything, you dont even have to do it at all, I just hope it’ll give you a little inspiration to improve!

Lily, OUT. 

EDIT: I made a group for it, you can submit images you do for this challenge here!

(via artchallengedirectory)

26 7 / 2014

26 7 / 2014

pencilcat:

Are you tired of feeling like your art just isn’t improving? Do you want to do a 30-day challenge that’s actually useful? Welcome to 30 Days of Improvement Hell. >:D

I made this because I’ve been feeling super ‘blah’ about my art these days, and I needed something to kick-start…

26 7 / 2014

moon-toons:

I’ve been meaning to create something like this for a while, so here it is:
30-Day Monster Boy Challenge!
Goal: Draw 30 pictures featuring some fabulous male monsters! Try to do something new with each drawing. Aim to reach a point of completion with each drawing. Challenge yourself, and have fun!
Useful resources to help: Godchecker, List of demon sigils, Mythical creature wiki, Wikipedia’s list of legendary creatures, Gods & Monsters
Hope you enjoy!

moon-toons:

I’ve been meaning to create something like this for a while, so here it is:

30-Day Monster Boy Challenge!

Goal: Draw 30 pictures featuring some fabulous male monsters! Try to do something new with each drawing. Aim to reach a point of completion with each drawing. Challenge yourself, and have fun!

Useful resources to help: Godchecker, List of demon sigils, Mythical creature wiki, Wikipedia’s list of legendary creatures, Gods & Monsters

Hope you enjoy!

(via artchallengedirectory)

28 4 / 2014

"Take a step back. Look at yourself. You are human. You are beautiful. you are so beautiful. And you can be anything. You can be everything. Do not hate because someone broke your heart, or because your parents split up or your best friend betrayed you. Do not concern yourself with things you cannot control. Cry when you need to, then let go when it’s time. Don’t hang on to painful memories just because you’re afraid to forget. Let go of things that are in the past. Forget things that aren’t worth remembering. Stop taking things for granted. Stop taking life for granted. Live for something. Live for yourself. Fall in love. Fall out of love. Fall in love. Fall out of love. Do this over and over until you know what it really is to love someone. Question things. Tell people how you really feel. Sleep under the stars. Create. Imagine. Inspire. Share something wonderful. Make something beautiful and then destroy it. Meet new people. Make someone’s day. Follow your dreams. Live your life to its full potential. Just live. Let go of all the horrible things in your life and just live. And one day, when you’re old, look back with no regrets."

Daily Relatable Love Quotes (via thelovewhisperer)

(via thelovewhisperer)

27 4 / 2014

thelovenotebook:

Everything love

thelovenotebook:

Everything love

26 4 / 2014